April 2 12

I’m a camera person.

This is no secret. I take a lot of pictures of my three children. In our backyard. On our porch. In the woods behind our house. In our furniture-less room that has become our makeshift dance and photo studio. Hundreds. Thousands. And the truth is, for the most part, they love being in front of that camera, hamming it up.

Mostly. 

“Again Mama?” they sometimes ask, done with the smiles, done with the posing. They just want to go back to being kids. And I get that.

So, lately, I have been compromising and letting my kids just be kids. I no longer haul my camera to every single thing we ever do ever. They get to go to the park poseless. They get to go bike riding poseless. They get to have playdates and bake cookies and jump on the trampoline and create melty bead projects. There is nothing forced about their smiles. They just get to be kids.

Mostly. 

In exchange, of course, they give me the shots that I absolutely have to have. Obviously.

It’s win-win for everyone.

It’s interesting, though, for me, as a CAMERA PERSON that I now show up at events like Isabella’s ice skating medal ceremony without my big DSLR. Other people are actually shocked to see me without it.

Instead, I now stand around and watch my kid. I watch her sit around for over half an hour watching all the kids being hoisted onto the fake podium, being presented with medals, waiting patiently for her turn. And then her turn comes and she is so filled with glee. She spots us in the crowd and waves maniacally, watching US watching HER. She is so proud to be standing up there.

(Another thing I do not do: record every moment of every school presentation ever.)

(To quote Sammy in Reality Bites: I just do not understand why this moment needs to be Memorexed.)

Sure, I get looks from all the parents behind their cameras and video cameras. Look at that mom. She obviously doesn’t love her kid enough to have this entire 6-year-old medal ceremony on tape for her to watch back NEVER EVER.

Judge me if you will. But I’m not part of the PARENT PAPARAZZI.

It’s big business, kids.

But, I don’t know, if you ask me, getting that one special shot is so much more meaningful to me.

It’s what I want to remember.

It’s what I want HER to remember.

It’s what I know that she will.

 

-
  1. So many things about this post. First, I can’t believe how grown-up Isabella looks. Second, I am the opposite parent – never really have a camera at the perfect moment and I feel a bit guilty for letting so many photo opps go by. I know that one day we will look back on the pictures to show our daughter how much fun she was having at the park and how young her Mom and Dad looked and I have to make more of an effort to take those shots. And yes, that one pic of Isabella does say it all. She’s so happy!

    [Reply]

    Comment by Jen on April 2, 2012
  2. Maybe I just haven’t perfected my abilities, but I find that I am much more present with my kids if I am not trying to get that perfect shot to record the moment. Being behind the lens removes me from just being there to enjoy events.

    [Reply]

    alimartell replied on

    That’s what I’m saying. I sat and watched the event and didn’t snap a single shot. I got the shot AFTER, when she came off of the ice and I grabbed her happiness and her medal all at once…and didn’t have to stand there snapping away in a sea of other parents…if that makes sense?

    [Reply]

    Comment by Laura on April 2, 2012
  3. Yes. Just yes.

    [Reply]

    Comment by Heather on April 2, 2012
  4. She’s so grown up!

    [Reply]

    alimartell replied on

    I probably don’t notice because she’s the baby. Or something.

    [Reply]

    Comment by Kristabella on April 2, 2012
  5. I totally get what you’re saying. My son’s Atom hockey team one their championship banner – this is such a huge moment and not one of us – all 14 x 2 parents – got a decent shot of them on the ice when they were presented with their banner lol .. we were all so giddy and caught up in the moment but I will always remember THAT moment where I wasn’t behind the lense the whole time. We’ll have to do some team pictures after the fact now, but that’s ok, seeing it with my own eyes was perfect. And, getting a snapsnot in the dressing room after the championship game of my son flanked by his grandparents, priceless!

    [Reply]

    Comment by Sarah on April 2, 2012
  6. I’ve got to learn to do this. Although there is NO WAY I would get ON THE ICE for something like this. Just, no.

    [Reply]

    Comment by Mrs. Wilson on April 2, 2012
  7. Like you I loVe the camera. My daughter, now 21 and a new mom herself, appreciates every shot I have ever taken of her and our family. She pours over every moment with a satisfied smile. I think what is also true is that some parents ARE paparazzi. They stalk, position, take a billions shots, get in the way of other parents. This is not the goal. We’re stealth and discreet [well mostly]. We get in and out and are satisfied that we captured a moment. It doesn’t have to be perfect, just meaningful to you and your child. Beautiful shot by the way.

    [Reply]

    Comment by Alison Pentland (@FeeFiFoFunFaery) on April 2, 2012
  8. I too am a memory hoarder, however I do try to be present too. About once a week I try to pick up my camera and just shoot the “hanging out times”. Reading books, bath time, playing, whatever. My son is only two and already I am loving having those little every day things as a part of my hoard. ;) Sometimes one shot says is all… good job.

    [Reply]

    Comment by Suzanne on April 2, 2012
  9. That picture where she’s so thrilled and proud of herself (and what a great shot!) will mean far more to her (and you) than the hours of video no one will ever watch again.

    [Reply]

    Comment by melissa on April 3, 2012
  10. This post is awesome sauce.

    [Reply]

    Comment by Louise on April 3, 2012
-

Allowed tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

css.php